Chester's back!
by written and illustrated by Mélanie Watt.
Click here to see if we have it Publishers Weekly : Starred Review. In this mischievous follow-up to her comical metafiction, Chester, Watt—who is both character and author—thinks she's hit on a way to keep her cat's huge ego in check: make him the star of his very own fairy tale. But as Chester once again makes clear, scrawling in red marker over almost every page (only the endpapers are left unscathed), he's not going to be easily placated—or dismissed. Being a picture book star has gone to his already swollen head: Dear admirers, he begins, Due to an overwhelming amount of fan mail, I, Chester, am back.... Colorful envelopes below this message are addressed to Chester from Shakespeare (Your #1 Fan), Einstein and Picasso; a typed note from M.W. next to an author photo reads, Please forgive Chester. He's forgotten to mention that he wrote all those fan letters himself. A tiny mouse (Chester labels him his butler) provides running commentary, sometimes through gestures only. Readers will be dazzled by the cat's rampant self-regard (he claims to have invented the wheel) and tickled by his ongoing battle of wits with his owner/creator. Ages 4–8. (Aug.) Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Distributed by Syndetic Solutions Inc. Terms

School Library Journal : K-Gr 2—The big calico cat with an even bigger ego is back. Watt attempts to feature him in a fairy tale, but as readers of Chester (Kids Can, 2007) will anticipate, he is not interested. He whips out his red marker and makes the story his own-until Watt decides to replace him altogether. The author holds a casting call and tries to carry on with a replacement for Chester. Of course, the feisty feline will not let that happen, and for a moment readers may think that he has come out on top. Chester wants to be the star of the story, but as the saying goes, "Be careful what you wish for!" The little gray mouse that was featured in the original book also returns. Chester has a great range of expressions that work along with the red-marker text to develop a lovable character. The use of color and font to indicate the speakers and the mix of various illustration styles add definition to the story-within-the-story, and the pages are full of activity. Readers will discover new details with each viewing. This is an original and fun tale for sharing one-on-one and in small groups.—Lisa Glasscock, Columbine Public Library, Littleton, CO Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Distributed by Syndetic Solutions Inc. Terms